Tag Archives: United States Naval Academy

Commander Eugene B. Fluckey, USN (December 14, 1944-February 15, 1945)

Eugene Bennett Fluckey was born in Washington, District of Columbia on October 5, 1913. He graduated with the United States Naval Academy class of 1935 and commissioned as an Ensign in the United States Navy. After a few years in surface ships, he reported for submarine training in 1938.

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Commander George F. Davis, USN (January 6, 1945)

As a member of the United States Naval Academy class of 1934, George Fleming Davis assuredly learned the immortal words of Captain James Lawrence of the frigate USS Chesapeake in 1813: “Don’t give up the ship!”

Davis was born on March 23, 1911 in Manila, the Philippines. His first service with the fleet was on destroyers. In mid-1941 he was promoted to Lieutenant and posted to the battleship USS Oklahoma (BB-37). In the opening moments of the United States in World War II, Davis had to give up his ship as she capsized and sank from multiple strikes from Japanese torpedoes at Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. Oklahoma took 429 of her more than 1,300 crew with her.

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Commander Ernest E. Evans, USN (October 25, 1944)

Ernest Edwin Evans was born in Pawnee, Oklahoma on August 13, 1908. He graduated from the United States Naval Academy with the class of 1931 and was commissioned as an Ensign in the United States Navy. He commanded two destroyers during World War II. Early in the war, he was captain of the USS Alden (DD-211). Later he was the first and only captain of the USS Johnston (DD-557) [featured image].

It was as captain of the Johnston during the Battle off Samar in the larger Battle of Leyte Gulf that he was decorated with the Medal of Honor for his great courage.

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Commander Richard H. O’Kane, USN (October 23-24, 1944)

Two days ago, I gave the story of the greatest Naval Aviator of World War II: David McCampbell. Today, we get the story of the greatest submarine officer and commander of the war, who was credited with sinking 31 Japanese vessels as the commanding officer of the USS Tang (SS-306). Richard Hetherington O’Kane was born in Dover, New Hampshire on February 2, 1911. He graduated with the United States Naval Academy class of 1934 and commissioned as an Ensign in the United States Navy and later volunteered for submarine duty in 1938.

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Commander Lawson P. Ramage, USN (July 31, 1944)

Lawson Paterson Ramage was born in Monroe Bridge, Massachusetts on January 19, 1909. He attended the United States Naval Academy and graduated with the class of 1931, receiving his officer’s commission in the United States Navy as an Ensign.

Ramage, nicknamed “Red” for his red hair, served in surface ships until 1935. He wanted to switch to submarines, but a sports injury which damaged his right eye (he had wrestled at the Naval Academy) stopped him from passing the eye test for submariners. Ramage’s solution: he memorized the eye chart.

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Commander Samuel David Dealey, USN (May 26-July 3, 1944)

Samuel David Dealey was born on September 13, 1906 in Dallas, Texas. He received an appointment to the United States Naval Academy and graduated with the class of 1930. He served his first several years in the United States Navy on surface ships before reporting to New London, Connecticut for Submarine School.

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TFH 7/6: LCDR Bruce A. Van Voorhis, USN

Bruce Avery Van Voorhis was born on January 29, 1908 in Aberdeen, Washington and spent his childhood years in Nevada. He was appointed to the United States Naval Academy in 1925, and graduated with the class of 1929. His first assignment was to the USS Mississippi (BB-41), but he only spent about one year with the battleship before reporting to Naval Air Station Pensacola for training as a Naval Aviator.

After earning his “Wings of Gold” on September 3, 1931, Van Voorhis flew a variety of carrier-based and other aircraft, and served aboard and flew off off the USS Saratoga (CV-3), USS Ranger (CV-4), USS Yorktown (CV-5), and USS Enterprise (CV-6) before the United States entered World War II.

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TFH 4/30: CDR Richard N. Antrim, USN

Richard Nott Antrim was born on December 17, 1907 in Peru, Indiana. His service to our Nation began in 1927 when he entered the United States Naval Academy, graduating with the class of 1931 and receiving his officer’s commission as an Ensign in the United States Navy. His early service days saw him posted as a fire control officer on the battleship USS New York (BB-34) after which he received flight training as a Naval Aviator.

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