Tag Archives: Texas

Commander Samuel David Dealey, USN (May 26-July 3, 1944)

Samuel David Dealey was born on September 13, 1906 in Dallas, Texas. He received an appointment to the United States Naval Academy and graduated with the class of 1930. He served his first several years in the United States Navy on surface ships before reporting to New London, Connecticut for Submarine School.

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Lieutenant Colonel Robert G. Cole, USA (June 11, 1944)

Robert George Cole was born on March 19, 1915 at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas. His father was a doctor in the United States Army. Cole himself enlisted in the Army on July 1, 1934 and was honorably discharged about one year later to become a cadet at the United States Military Academy, West Point.

Cole graduated West Point with the class of 1939 and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the infantry branch. In early 1941, he volunteered for the nascent airborne force, and earned his parachute jump wings in March of that year. With the United States’ entry into World War II, advancement in the airborne was rapid.

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Second Lieutenant Thomas W. Fowler, USA (May 23, 1944)

Second Lieutenant Thomas Weldon Fowler was born in Wichita Falls, Texas on October 31, 1921. After graduating from Wichita Falls High School, he entered Texas A&M in September 1939. Fowler majored in animal husbandry. As a senior, he served as a cadet captain and executive officer of the cavalry squadron. Fowler graduated in February, 1943

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The American Horror Next Door

“Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. 

“Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”… 

Now, therefore, be it known, that I, William H. Seward, Secretary of State of the United States…do hereby certify that the amendment aforesaid has become valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of the Constitution of the United States. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the Department of State to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington, this eighteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninetieth. 

Proclamation of the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, December 18, 1865.

Today, in the closing days of the two hundred and thirty-seventh year of American Independence, less than one hundred and fifty years since the constitutional abolition of slavery in the United States, we take that abolition completely for granted. That’s a bold statement, I know, but I believe it completely justified.

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