PFC Kaoru Moto & TSG Ted T. Tanouye, USA (July 7, 1944)

http://servantspouse.com/ Seventy years ago today on July 7, 1944, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team – predominately comprised of Nisei (2nd generation, born-citizen Japanese-Americans) – continued the fight for Hill 140 near Castellina, Italy. Two of the regiment’s soldiers had already exhibited heroism worthy of the Medal of Honor.

buy Lyrica canada On this day, Private First Class Kaoru Moto and Technical Sergeant Ted T. Tanouye would join them.

go here Kaoru Moto was drafted into the United States Army on March 24, 1941. He succeeded in neutralizing three Nazi German machine guns despite being wounded.

From Medal of Honor Citations for World War II (M-S):

MOH-200px

Moto, later in life. Photo: Military Times’ Hall of Valor

*MOTO, KAORU

Citation: Private First Class Kaoru Moto distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on 7 July 1944, near Castellina, Italy. While serving as first scout, Private First Class Moto observed a machine gun nest that was hindering his platoon’s progress. On his own initiative, he made his way to a point ten paces from the hostile position, and killed the enemy machine gunner. Immediately, the enemy assistant gunner opened fire in the direction of Private First Class Moto. Crawling to the rear of the position, Private First Class Moto surprised the enemy soldier, who quickly surrendered. Taking his prisoner with him, Private First Class Moto took a position a few yards from a house to prevent the enemy from using the building as an observation post. While guarding the house and his prisoner, he observed an enemy machine gun team moving into position. He engaged them, and with deadly fire forced the enemy to withdraw. An enemy sniper located in another house fired at Private First Class Moto, severely wounding him. Applying first aid to his wound, he changed position to elude the sniper fire and to advance. Finally relieved of his position, he made his way to the rear for treatment. Crossing a road, he spotted an enemy machine gun nest. Opening fire, he wounded two of the three soldiers occupying the position. Not satisfied with this accomplishment, he then crawled forward to a better position and ordered the enemy soldier to surrender. Receiving no answer, Private First Class Moto fired at the position, and the soldiers surrendered. Private First Class Moto’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.

Moto survived the war and was discharged in 1945. He passed away at age 75 on August 26, 1992 and was laid to rest in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Ted Takayuki “Tak” Tanouye was born on November 14, 1919 in Torrance, California. He was drafted on February 20, 1942. He successfully led his platoon in the attack despite suffering wounds. After they seized their objective thanks largely to Tak’s own personal courage, he organized them in the defense.

From Medal of Honor Citations for World War II (T-Z):MOH-200px

Photo: Military Times’ Hall of Valor

*TANOUYE, TED T.

Citation: Technical Sergeant Ted T. Tanouye distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on 7 July 1944, near Molino A Ventoabbto, Italy. Technical Sergeant Tanouye led his platoon in an attack to capture the crest of a strategically important hill that afforded little cover. Observing an enemy machine gun crew placing its gun in position to his left front, Technical Sergeant Tanouye crept forward a few yards and opened fire on the position, killing or wounding three and causing two others to disperse. Immediately, an enemy machine pistol opened fire on him. He returned the fire and killed or wounded three more enemy soldiers. While advancing forward, Technical Sergeant Tanouye was subjected to grenade bursts, which severely wounded his left arm. Sighting an enemy-held trench, he raked the position with fire from his submachine gun and wounded several of the enemy. Running out of ammunition, he crawled 20 yards to obtain several clips from a comrade on his left flank. Next, sighting an enemy machine pistol that had pinned down his men, Technical Sergeant Tanouye crawled forward a few yards and threw a hand grenade into the position, silencing the pistol. He then located another enemy machine gun firing down the slope of the hill, opened fire on it, and silenced that position. Drawing fire from a machine pistol nest located above him, he opened fire on it and wounded three of its occupants. Finally taking his objective, Technical Sergeant Tanouye organized a defensive position on the reverse slope of the hill before accepting first aid treatment and evacuation. Technical Sergeant Tanouye’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.

Technical Sergeant Tanouye was gravely wounded by a landmine on September 1, 1944. He succumbed to his wounds five days later. He today rests in peace at the Evergreen Cemetery, Los Angeles, California.

Both Moto and Tanouye were originally awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for their actions. Both men’s awards were upgraded to the Medal of Honor in the late 1990’s review of service records of Japanese-Americans who had been denied proper recognition due to racial discrimination.

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