Staff Sergeant Rudolph B. Davila, USA (May 28, 1944)

cheapest place to buy doxycycline tablets Rudolph B. Davila was born in El Paso, Texas on April 27, 1916. His enlistment record indicates he was a high school graduate and working as a carpenter in Los Angeles, California when he was drafted for service in the United States Army on March 6, 1941.

buy finasteride in canada Davila was an infantryman with Company H, 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during the breakout from the Anzio beachhead in Italy during late May 1944.

http://shimmeringsands.me/2017/12/followfriday-2/ On May 28, 1944, then Staff Sergeant Davila ignored the enemy fires surrounding him and the wounds he received to deliver devastating heavy weapons fire in support of another unit. He was originally awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his heroism.

In the late 1990s, Davila’s heroism was among that reviewed by the Army for possible upgrade to the Medal of Honor. The Army determined that his recognition had been sold short, and on June 21, 2000, he received the Medal from President Bill Clinton at the White House.

From Medal of Honor Citations for World War II (A-F):

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Image: Wikipedia

DAVILA, RUDOLPH B.

Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company H, 7th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division. Place and date: Artena, Italy, 28 May, 1944.

Citation: Staff Sergeant Rudolph B. Davila distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action, on 28 May 1944, near Artena, Italy. During the offensive which broke through the German mountain strongholds surrounding the Anzio beachhead, Staff Sergeant Davila risked death to provide heavy weapons support for a beleaguered rifle company. Caught on an exposed hillside by heavy, grazing fire from a well-entrenched German force, his machine gunners were reluctant to risk putting their guns into action. Crawling fifty yards to the nearest machine gun, Staff Sergeant Davila set it up alone and opened fire on the enemy. In order to observe the effect of his fire, Sergeant Davila fired from the kneeling position, ignoring the enemy fire that struck the tripod and passed between his legs. Ordering a gunner to take over, he crawled forward to a vantage point and directed the firefight with hand and arm signals until both hostile machine guns were silenced. Bringing his three remaining machine guns into action, he drove the enemy to a reserve position two hundred yards to the rear. When he received a painful wound in the leg, he dashed to a burned tank and, despite the crash of bullets on the hull, engaged a second enemy force from the tank’s turret. Dismounting, he advanced 130 yards in short rushes, crawled 20 yards and charged into an enemy-held house to eliminate the defending force of five with a hand grenade and rifle fire. Climbing to the attic, he straddled a large shell hole in the wall and opened fire on the enemy. Although the walls of the house were crumbling, he continued to fire until he had destroyed two more machine guns. His intrepid actions brought desperately needed heavy weapons support to a hard-pressed rifle company and silenced four machine gunners, which forced the enemy to abandon their prepared positions. Staff Sergeant Davila’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.

In his post-war civilian life, Davila graduated from the University of Southern California with both bachelor’s and master’s degrees. He was a high school history teacher, and retired in 1977.

Davila passed away on January 26, 2002 and was laid to rest among our nation’s most honored dead in Arlington National Cemetery.

3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry is presently a light infantry battalion in the 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team in the modern 3rd Infantry Division. Their home post is Fort Stewart, Georgia.

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